Jacarte was established in 2006.  We design and create the finest handmade, optical crystal sculptures, vases, and perfume bottles.  We are especially proud of our inside painted glass art masterpieces which flawlessly transport, into contemporary times, skills and techniques established hundreds of years ago.  We accomplish our goals through what we call Trans-Pacific Coalition of Remarkable Talent ™.  Our designers and artists, almost exclusively living and working in the US, give birth to many of our pieces.  Then, a collective of artisans and inside painting master artists, calling on skills that exist only in certain provinces in China, give substance to the vision.

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Jacarte Three Collections


Jacarte Classics  -  This is our collection of classically inside-painted and completely hand-sculpted vessels of various shapes and sizes.  Both functional and non, some are designed as vases, some as perfume bottles, and some simply as objets dart.  Each begins as an original painting or photograph which is ultimately adapted to, and recreated within, an original glass sculpture.  Each of our master inside-painters has at least fifteen years of experience.


Custom Photo Crystals  -  This is our newest collection. Designed for the museum, promotional, and souvenir industries, as well as for  individuals who have a photo or artwork they want "Crystallized", our PaperWeights, WireWeights (TM) and "Stand-Ups" are all custom products. Available in any quantity, they bring any logo, artwork, or photograph to a new level of vibrance and value.


Mini Vases and Snuff Bottles  -  This is our collection, both permanent and revolving, of exquisite, quality inside-painted snuff bottles.  Authentically created in every sense, our artists in China are responsible for both conception and execution.  Each bottle is selected for its beauty, artistry, and symbolism.  Price points vary depending on artist and complexity.



The History of Inside Painted Glass


The history of Inside Painting dates back 200 years.  The history of the snuff bottle even longer - to the late 16th century.  European traders, travelling over the dangerous Silk Road, introduced tobacco to the Chinese at that time.  Shortly thereafter, under the Qing Dynasty, smoking tobacco was declared to be illegal.  However, chopping it up into a fine powder, which came to be called snuff, was encouraged.  It was thought that, in this reincarnation, tobacco had medicinal properties.  To protect against the elements, the Chinese stored and carried snuff in air tight bottles.


By the end of the 17th century and through most of the 19th century, it had become custom to offer snuff as a form of greeting.  It was not long before snuff bottles became more than just a container.  Indeed, they became much sought after objects of beauty and art.  It is easy to imagine how a finely decorated snuff bottle simultaneously generated conversation and status.


Inside-painting developed in the late 18th century.  It was a method in which to decorate the (by then ubiquitous) glass bottle without the risk of the paint wearing off.  A bamboo hooked brush, with just a few hairs at one end, was inserted through the neck of the bottle, and an image and/or Chinese calligraphic characters, painted in reverse from within.  While it is easy to see that this would require tremendous patience, concentration, and manual dexterity, it is also paradoxically difficult to imagine that such artistry is humanly possible!


While the use of snuff died away soon after the establishment of the Republic of China, original snuff bottles from the Qing period have become much sought after by serious collectors.  Some fetch thousands, occasionally even hundreds of thousands, of dollars at auction.  They have been recognized as true masterpieces in miniature and can be viewed in many private, as well as museum, collections the world over.

A Brief History of the Snuff Bottle


By some accounts, European traders, traveling over the dangerous Silk Road, introduced tobacco to the Chinese in the 1600s.  Shortly thereafter, under the Qing Dynasty, smoking tobacco was declared to be illegal.  However, chopping it up into a fine powder(“snuff”)was encouraged.  It was thought that, in this reincarnation, tobacco had medicinal properties.  To protect against the elements, the Chinese stored and carried snuff in air tight bottles.


By the end of the 17th century and through most of the 19th,  it had become customary to offer snuff as a form of greeting.  It was not long before snuff bottles became more than just a container.  Indeed, they became much sought after objects of beauty and art.  It is easy to imagine how a finely decorated snuff bottle generated both conversation and status.


Inside-painting developed in the late 18th century.  It was a method by which to decorate the (by then ubiquitous) glass bottle without the risk of the paint wearing off.  A bamboo hooked brush, with just a few hairs at one end, was inserted through the neck of the bottle, and an image and/or Chinese calligraphic characters, painted in reverse from within.  While it is easy to see that this would require tremendous patience, concentration, and manual dexterity, it is also paradoxically difficult to imagine that such artistry is humanly possible at all!


While the use of snuff died away soon after the establishment of the Republic of China, original snuff bottles from the Qing period have become sought after by serious collectors.  Some fetch thousands, occasionally even hundreds of thousands, of dollars at auction.  They have been recognized as true masterpieces in miniature and can be viewed in many private, as well as museum, collections the world over.

How We Create a Jacarte Masterpiece